Home

Adapting…

Leave a comment

Single digits (again).
All bike racks buried under feet of snow.
The winter that goes on and on.

The desire to stop for a beer and a couple slices of pizza.

 
Adapt.
verb.
: to change your behavior so that it is easier to live in a particular place or situation.
: to change (something) so that it functions better or is better suited for a purpose.

Urban Simplicity.

A few things I saw while riding my bike today…

Leave a comment

From top to bottom…

The soon-to-be new headquarters of the Delaware-North Company.

Grain Elevators on the Buffalo River as seen from the Ohio Street lift bridge.

What I believe is a Peregrine falcon hunting on the river.

The Michigan Street Baptist Church.

Buffalo, NY as seen from Ohio Street.

The Shamrock Run as they cross the Michigan Street lift bridge.

A building in the Cobblestone District.

Urban Simplicity.

Things that can be carried on a bike (#627)…

Leave a comment

A tripod, a gym bag full of wet clothes, a camera bag with two cameras and an extra lens, a book, and four slices of spinach pizza in two boxes.

Urban Simplicity.

The view from my handlebars and a few words…

Leave a comment

“Sometimes I arrive just when God’s ready to have someone click the shutter.”

~Ansel Adams

So I–along with about twenty other people–are partaking in Buffalo Fun-a-Day…doing some sort of art each day for the month of February (in my case, photography) and in March there will be a show at Sugar City. Anyhow, the reason I mention this, is that after work tonight I thought I would ride over to the Richardson Towers to take photos of them as the sun set (and to use as today’s Fun-a-Day photo). To see previous photos of the Richardson Towers, click here or here. Anyhow, when I got there it was cold, really cold, as it has been. But the light wasn’t hitting the towers as I had hoped…I probably had 15 or 20 minutes before it changed. And I didn’t feel like standing there shivering while waiting for the light (in warmer temps I would). From where I was standing, looking at the towers were north, and then I glanced to my left (west, where the sun was setting) and saw the above photo perfectly framed and full of light. The tree of life, I thought. I have my photo, I also thought. So I snapped a few photos with stinging fingers (no need to set up a tripod as there was still enough light in the sky), and then rode to a local watering hole for a couple beers to warm up before my ride home.

Urban Simplicity.

A Photo and a Poem

Leave a comment

February 2015

It

Has

Been

So

Cold

Things that can be carried on a bike (#626)…

Leave a comment

$158 worth of groceries…

So I’ve often wondered what my limit was, how much I could carry on a regular-sized bike. And today I found it. It’s the heavy stuff–liquids such as milk and juice, and also flours–that really make it difficult. And I’d be lying if I didn’t say it was a difficult ride home, uphill and in a heavy snowfall. But in nicer weather I’m sure I could carry more.

Urban Simplicity.

Five or eight quotes from Ansel Adams…

Leave a comment

Photo Found Here 

 

February 20, 1902 – April 22, 1984

“When words become unclear, I shall focus with photographs. When images become inadequate, I shall be content with silence.”

“You don’t take a photograph, you make it.”

“There are no rules for good photographs, there are only good photographs.”

“Sometimes I arrive just when God’s ready to have someone click the shutter.”

“A great photograph is a full expression of what one feels about what is being photographed in the deepest sense and is thereby a true expression of what one feels about life in its entirety.”

“There are two people in every photograph: the photographer and the viewer”

“The whole world is, to me, very much “alive” – all the little growing things, even the rocks. I can’t look at a swell bit of grass and earth, for instance, without feeling the essential life – the things going on – within them. The same goes for a mountain, or a bit of the ocean, or a magnificent piece of old wood.”

“The single most important component of a camera is the twelve inches behind it!”

More in the Five Quotes series.

Urban Simplicity.

Older Entries

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 100 other followers