Category Archives: computers

The Theology of Steve Jobs

Image found here.

I wasn’t going to write or post anything about Steve Jobs for a few reasons. One is that info regarding him, his life, and his recent transition, is currently proliferating not only the Internet but all forms of media. The other reason is that I didn’t know him personally. But the more I thought about it the more I realized I owed him…because of the extent that personal computers have infiltrated my–like many people’s–life. Not just with this and previous blogs, but with writing in general. Though I work full-time as a cook, I work part-time as a freelance writer…and this is something I could never have done without a computer. I really cannot imagine how writers did it before the advent of the PC. To be quite honest, I really don’t believe I would have been published as many times or as often as I have if not for a computer; mostly because of my personal laziness…how much more work it would take to type, re-type, and edit without a computer. Anyhow, that’s all I plan on saying, other than an open and official thank you to Mr. Jobs for pioneering the thing on which I now type these very words.

What really prompted me to post on Steve Jobs was an article I read today at the Washington Post bearing the same title as this posting. What’s below is a portion of the story which was cut-and-paste; to read the entire article, click here.

“No one wants to die. Even people who want to go to heaven don’t want to die to get there. And yet death is the destination we all share. No one has ever escaped it. And that is as it should be, because death is very likely the single best invention of life. It is life’s change agent. It clears out the old to make way for the new. Right now the new is you, but someday not too long from now, you will gradually become the old and be cleared away. Sorry to be so dramatic, but it is quite true.
 

Your time is limited, so don’t waste it living someone else’s life. Don’t be trapped by dogma — which is living with the results of other people’s thinking. Don’t let the noise of others’ opinions drown out your own inner voice. And most important, have the courage to follow your heart and intuition. They somehow already know what you truly want to become. Everything else is secondary.”

–Steve Jobs 

Here’s one last quote I read, and this is from President Barack Obama:

“The world has lost a visionary. And there may be no greater tribute to Steve’s success than the fact that much of the world learned of his passing on a device he invented

The Theology of Steve Jobs

Image found here.

I wasn’t going to write or post anything about Steve Jobs for a few reasons. One is that info regarding him, his life, and his recent transition, is currently proliferating not only the Internet but all forms of media. The other reason is that I didn’t know him personally. But the more I thought about it the more I realized I owed him…because of the extent that personal computers have infiltrated my–like many people’s–life. Not just with this and previous blogs, but with writing in general. Though I work full-time as a cook, I work part-time as a freelance writer…and this is something I could never have done without a computer. I really cannot imagine how writers did it before the advent of the PC. To be quite honest, I really don’t believe I would have been published as many times or as often as I have if not for a computer; mostly because of my personal laziness…how much more work it would take to type, re-type, and edit without a computer. Anyhow, that’s all I plan on saying, other than an open and official thank you to Mr. Jobs for pioneering the thing on which I now type these very words.

What really prompted me to post on Steve Jobs was an article I read today at the Washington Post bearing the same title as this posting. What’s below is a portion of the story which was cut-and-paste; to read the entire article, click here.

“No one wants to die. Even people who want to go to heaven don’t want to die to get there. And yet death is the destination we all share. No one has ever escaped it. And that is as it should be, because death is very likely the single best invention of life. It is life’s change agent. It clears out the old to make way for the new. Right now the new is you, but someday not too long from now, you will gradually become the old and be cleared away. Sorry to be so dramatic, but it is quite true.
 

Your time is limited, so don’t waste it living someone else’s life. Don’t be trapped by dogma — which is living with the results of other people’s thinking. Don’t let the noise of others’ opinions drown out your own inner voice. And most important, have the courage to follow your heart and intuition. They somehow already know what you truly want to become. Everything else is secondary.”

–Steve Jobs 

Here’s one last quote I read, and this is from President Barack Obama:

“The world has lost a visionary. And there may be no greater tribute to Steve’s success than the fact that much of the world learned of his passing on a device he invented

>Mass-Produced Cheap Crap

>

This is a bit of a rant, but first I have to say that at times I feel I am a bit of an oxymoron…or at least a paradox. I say this because I attempt to espouse a simpler way of living in the city through this blog but at the same time I record it on a computer via the Internet…to live truly simply would be to get rid of my computer, kindle, and netbook and just write and read books instead (which I sometimes fantasize about doing). Ahh…but living in the times that we do I–like many–have come to rely on electronics for day-to-day tasks and entertainment (one can only wonder what some of the great writers would have produced if they had access to a computer with spell-check and the internet…maybe they would have ended up simply surfing the net and not writing at all…a little self-analysis I suppose). Anyhow, I’m getting off topic and am jumping ahead of myself…I’ll continue with the rant.

About a year-and-a-half ago I purchased a netbook that was on sale…only paid a couple hundred dollars for it…and it is a “quality” name brand. I use it occasionally, but not that often. I had the day off today (which is unusual for me on a weekday) and had an article to write so I thought I’d take my netbook to a local coffee shop to work. But when I turned it on I got the above message. That in itself isn’t that odd…one sees these messages on occasion. But no matter how many times I did a disk check or scanned it it would simply repeat itself…never fully booting up, not allowing any sort of safe mode or other over ride.. After doing some of my own research, via Google (on my desktop), I found that it may be that the hard drive has malfunctioned. I phoned a tech person who I trust and he agreed it may be the hard drive. I’ll take it to him tomorrow to find out for sure. He also said that he’ll be honest with me and say that if it is the hard drive it may not be worth it to have the work done…that with the parts and labor it would cost almost the same amount just to replace the entire machine.

What? It’s only 18 months old. Sad but true, he added. He’ll take my money (to repair it) if I want him to, he also added, but he’s just being honest.

This is the story of our “modern” society I suppose…rather than fix it, throw it in the trash and replace it. But what most of us (including myself) have never seen are one of the countless electronic dumps that dot our precious earth. So I’ll find out the prognosis in a day or two and then have a moral and financial dilemma to contend with…do I, being a single dad living week-to-week, spend the extra cash to repair this or just discard it? But I am jumping ahead again…if it is expensive to fix I do know that I will not replace it, probably donate it to someone who wants to repair it. But geeze ‘o man does this get my goat…it’s almost brand new. Thankfully I do not have any data on it that is not backed up on my desktop (and yes, Sean, this taught me a lesson…I’m getting an external hard drive to back up my desktop). Whatever happened to producing things that are built to last…but then again if things lasted we wouldn’t be able to be a consumeristic society (and yes, my tongue is firmly planted in my cheek).

If you want to read about the problem with cheaply made electronic trash and how it is filling our landfills, click here. If you are still interested here’s a good video (20 minutes) called The Story of Stuff.

Photo found here.

Mass-Produced Cheap Crap

This is a bit of a rant, but first I have to say that at times I feel I am a bit of an oxymoron…or at least a paradox. I say this because I attempt to espouse a simpler way of living in the city through this blog but at the same time I record it on a computer via the Internet…to live truly simply would be to get rid of my computer, kindle, and netbook and just write and read books instead (which I sometimes fantasize about doing). Ahh…but living in the times that we do I–like many–have come to rely on electronics for day-to-day tasks and entertainment (one can only wonder what some of the great writers would have produced if they had access to a computer with spell-check and the internet…maybe they would have ended up simply surfing the net and not writing at all…a little self-analysis I suppose). Anyhow, I’m getting off topic and am jumping ahead of myself…I’ll continue with the rant.

About a year-and-a-half ago I purchased a netbook that was on sale…only paid a couple hundred dollars for it…and it is a “quality” name brand. I use it occasionally, but not that often. I had the day off today (which is unusual for me on a weekday) and had an article to write so I thought I’d take my netbook to a local coffee shop to work. But when I turned it on I got the above message. That in itself isn’t that odd…one sees these messages on occasion. But no matter how many times I did a disk check or scanned it it would simply repeat itself…never fully booting up, not allowing any sort of safe mode or other over ride.. After doing some of my own research, via Google (on my desktop), I found that it may be that the hard drive has malfunctioned. I phoned a tech person who I trust and he agreed it may be the hard drive. I’ll take it to him tomorrow to find out for sure. He also said that he’ll be honest with me and say that if it is the hard drive it may not be worth it to have the work done…that with the parts and labor it would cost almost the same amount just to replace the entire machine.

What? It’s only 18 months old. Sad but true, he added. He’ll take my money (to repair it) if I want him to, he also added, but he’s just being honest.

This is the story of our “modern” society I suppose…rather than fix it, throw it in the trash and replace it. But what most of us (including myself) have never seen are one of the countless electronic dumps that dot our precious earth. So I’ll find out the prognosis in a day or two and then have a moral and financial dilemma to contend with…do I, being a single dad living week-to-week, spend the extra cash to repair this or just discard it? But I am jumping ahead again…if it is expensive to fix I do know that I will not replace it, probably donate it to someone who wants to repair it. But geeze ‘o man does this get my goat…it’s almost brand new. Thankfully I do not have any data on it that is not backed up on my desktop (and yes, Sean, this taught me a lesson…I’m getting an external hard drive to back up my desktop). Whatever happened to producing things that are built to last…but then again if things lasted we wouldn’t be able to be a consumeristic society (and yes, my tongue is firmly planted in my cheek).

If you want to read about the problem with cheaply made electronic trash and how it is filling our landfills, click here. If you are still interested here’s a good video (20 minutes) called The Story of Stuff.

Photo found here.