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Things That Can Be Carried On A Bike (#210), and a quick comment about cargo bikes

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A 15 lb. capacity, all-steel sausage stuffer.
A canvas bag containing 4 books.
A six-pack of Ellicottville Brewing Company Pale Ale.
A gym bagful of wet clothing.
A cardboard box containing 2 bottles of Chateau Saint Sulpice Bordeaux.
A pound of baker’s yeast.
Three pastry tarts.
A cardboard box full of kindling.

It’s interesting that when I was originally out today and passed by an intersection where there was road construction going on I saw a couple of workers point and laugh at the Mundo (can you believe it). At the time all I was carrying on the bike was the gym bag. I may be being paranoid (about the jesting), but I doubt it. Anyhow, on the way back, and as I crossed the same intersection, I had the bike fully loaded. This time they just looked in awe (as their monster trucks stood on the sidelines just waiting to suck fuel). The best I can figure is that they had a temporary case of cargo-bike envy. Another interesting thing is that while there was a long row of cars (mostly containing single passengers) waiting on queue for the construction, I was able to pedal through without haste.

>Things That Can Be Carried On A Bike (#210), and a quick comment about cargo bikes

6 Comments

>

A 15 lb. capacity, all-steel sausage stuffer.
A canvas bag containing 4 books.
A six-pack of Ellicottville Brewing Company Pale Ale.
A gym bagful of wet clothing.
A cardboard box containing 2 bottles of Chateau Saint Sulpice Bordeaux.
A pound of baker’s yeast.
Three pastry tarts.
A cardboard box full of kindling.

It’s interesting that when I was originally out today and passed by an intersection where there was road construction going on I saw a couple of workers point and laugh at the Mundo (can you believe it). At the time all I was carrying on the bike was the gym bag. I may be being paranoid (about the jesting), but I doubt it. Anyhow, on the way back, and as I crossed the same intersection, I had the bike fully loaded. This time they just looked in awe (as their monster trucks stood on the sidelines just waiting to suck fuel). The best I can figure is that they had a temporary case of cargo-bike envy. Another interesting thing is that while there was a long row of cars (mostly containing single passengers) waiting on queue for the construction, I was able to pedal through without haste.

Things That Can Be Carried On A Bike (#209)

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Four pieces of fruit, a Sunday newspaper, and a large spinach pizza.

>Things That Can Be Carried On A Bike (#209)

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Four pieces of fruit, a Sunday newspaper, and a large spinach pizza.

No Car Necessary

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George Bliss, co-owner of Hudson Urban Bicycles

The title of this post is taken directly from a July article in the New York Times titled, Hauling Cargo, No Car Necessary. It’s an inspiring article (and short video below) regarding, not surprisingly, cargo bikes. I’ve been interested in carrying stuff by bike since I was a little kid (opposed to the big kid that I am now), so this article and video really hits home. I also question if there is a cargo-hauling trike in my not-so-near future (maybe when I’m too old to balance properly). My biggest problem with a cargo trike like this is that I wouldn’t have any place to store it (as it is I currently store my three main bikes in my living room); I’d have to build some sort of an outdoor storage shed in my backyard. I’m sure there are some real load carrying benefits (and disabilities) to having three wheels instead of two. Interestingly (and you have to look for this to notice it), in the video when they are speaking with George Bliss in front of his shop, there are a couple quick images of a Mundo or two…he must sell them in NYC. At any rate, it’s a good (and brief) article and video; I encourage you to watch and read it…it’ll probably make you want to go haul some stuff.

http://graphics8.nytimes.com/bcvideo/1.0/iframe/embed.html?videoId=1247468460165&playerType=embed

>No Car Necessary

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>

George Bliss, co-owner of Hudson Urban Bicycles

The title of this post is taken directly from a July article in the New York Times titled, Hauling Cargo, No Car Necessary. It’s an inspiring article (and short video below) regarding, not surprisingly, cargo bikes. I’ve been interested in carrying stuff by bike since I was a little kid (opposed to the big kid that I am now), so this article and video really hits home. I also question if there is a cargo-hauling trike in my not-so-near future (maybe when I’m too old to balance properly). My biggest problem with a cargo trike like this is that I wouldn’t have any place to store it (as it is I currently store my three main bikes in my living room); I’d have to build some sort of an outdoor storage shed in my backyard. I’m sure there are some real load carrying benefits (and disabilities) to having three wheels instead of two. Interestingly (and you have to look for this to notice it), in the video when they are speaking with George Bliss in front of his shop, there are a couple quick images of a Mundo or two…he must sell them in NYC. At any rate, it’s a good (and brief) article and video; I encourage you to watch and read it…it’ll probably make you want to go haul some stuff.

http://graphics8.nytimes.com/bcvideo/1.0/iframe/embed.html?videoId=1247468460165&playerType=embed

My Favorite Summertime Sandwich

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Tomatoes, basil, and razor-thin slivers of hot chilies straight from the garden; layered with raw onion and sharp cheddar, then slathered with mayonnaise on homemade 100% whole wheat bread (click here for a recipe).

In a word: dinner!

>My Favorite Summertime Sandwich

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>

Tomatoes, basil, and razor-thin slivers of hot chilies straight from the garden; layered with raw onion and sharp cheddar, then slathered with mayonnaise on homemade 100% whole wheat bread (click here for a recipe).

In a word: dinner!

Stand Alone (part two)

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This video was posted on Facebook today and I thought I’d share it in reference to a previous post. If I can manage to squirrel away the $77.00 I may still get this…but I’m still on the fence about it. I will say that this very brief video is pretty convincing. I’d love to hear what others think about this or if anyone has used one yet (and thanks again to those who offered comments and insights on the previous post on this subject).

>Stand Alone (part two)

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>This video was posted on Facebook today and I thought I’d share it in reference to a previous post. If I can manage to squirrel away the $77.00 I may still get this…but I’m still on the fence about it. I will say that this very brief video is pretty convincing. I’d love to hear what others think about this or if anyone has used one yet (and thanks again to those who offered comments and insights on the previous post on this subject).

Things That Can Be Carried On A Bike (#208)…with a link, a few comments, and another photo.

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Sometimes (more often than not, actually) the only thing I carry on this bike is me. While it weighs in the upwards of 60 lbs. and is more then 6 ft. long I still find it the most comfortable and fun bike to ride (out of my 3 main bikes). Not only does it’s upright position and big cushy ride make it super fun, but having the loading capacity capacity available (should I need it) makes it all the more worthwhile. I truly love being both the motor and the cargo (on any bike). I was thinking just that when I rode home tonight and saw the full moon (pictured below)…it literally stopped me in my tracks and I had to snap a picture of it while at an intersection. I stopped and looked at it for a while (something I wouldn’t have been able to do if  were in a car) and was in awe to think that people around the world (if it were night in their part of the world) could see the same moon that I was looking at. It made me feel small, and sometimes I think it is good for a person to really small. It keeps things in perspective for me.

On a different note, I thought I’d share this link to an article that was in the Buffalo News today (our local daily paper). It’s titled, Boost body and mind with bicycling. It’s a brief but good article promoting bicycling as a way of life and all the benefits that are naturally associated with it.

As I’ve stated in many previous posts, I ride for many of the obvious reasons, but the reason I ride for mostly is purely selfish…I ride because I really like it.

>Things That Can Be Carried On A Bike (#208)…with a link, a few comments, and another photo.

2 Comments

>

Sometimes (more often than not, actually) the only thing I carry on this bike is me. While it weighs in the upwards of 60 lbs. and is more then 6 ft. long I still find it the most comfortable and fun bike to ride (out of my 3 main bikes). Not only does it’s upright position and big cushy ride make it super fun, but having the loading capacity capacity available (should I need it) makes it all the more worthwhile. I truly love being both the motor and the cargo (on any bike). I was thinking just that when I rode home tonight and saw the full moon (pictured below)…it literally stopped me in my tracks and I had to snap a picture of it while at an intersection. I stopped and looked at it for a while (something I wouldn’t have been able to do if  were in a car) and was in awe to think that people around the world (if it were night in their part of the world) could see the same moon that I was looking at. It made me feel small, and sometimes I think it is good for a person to really small. It keeps things in perspective for me.

On a different note, I thought I’d share this link to an article that was in the Buffalo News today (our local daily paper). It’s titled, Boost body and mind with bicycling. It’s a brief but good article promoting bicycling as a way of life and all the benefits that are naturally associated with it.

As I’ve stated in many previous posts, I ride for many of the obvious reasons, but the reason I ride for mostly is purely selfish…I ride because I really like it.

Marie and Pierre Curie on Their Honeymoon

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Photo downloaded from Britannica.

I find this photo inspiring. The link to it was sent to me by a cousin of mine (thanks Joe!). It’s a photo of the famed physicists and chemist Marie and Pierre Curie. While they shared a Nobel Prize together, Marie was the first person to receive two. The photo was taken in 1895, and while the automobile was not common then they did have other methods of transport from which to choose…but they chose bicycles for their honeymoon transportation. One can only hope that they would have done the same today.

>Marie and Pierre Curie on Their Honeymoon

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>

Photo downloaded from Britannica.

I find this photo inspiring. The link to it was sent to me by a cousin of mine (thanks Joe!). It’s a photo of the famed physicists and chemist Marie and Pierre Curie. While they shared a Nobel Prize together, Marie was the first person to receive two. The photo was taken in 1895, and while the automobile was not common then they did have other methods of transport from which to choose…but they chose bicycles for their honeymoon transportation. One can only hope that they would have done the same today.

Squiggly Man Makes Me Smile

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I don’t even remember how I came upon this site…you know how it goes…one page leads to the next and then another, not unlike flipping through a magazine I suppose. Anyhow I came across this 4 minute video titled Everything Will Be OK. I kept waiting for something to happen, but nothing ever did…it’s just a clip of the Squiggly Man blowin’ in the wind for 4 minutes. But interestingly at the end of the four minutes I found myself not only relaxed but also smiling. This video is either idiocy at it’s finest  or pure genius.

>Squiggly Man Makes Me Smile

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>I don’t even remember how I came upon this site…you know how it goes…one page leads to the next and then another, not unlike flipping through a magazine I suppose. Anyhow I came across this 4 minute video titled Everything Will Be OK. I kept waiting for something to happen, but nothing ever did…it’s just a clip of the Squiggly Man blowin’ in the wind for 4 minutes. But interestingly at the end of the four minutes I found myself not only relaxed but also smiling. This video is either idiocy at it’s finest  or pure genius.

Ezekiel Bread French Toast with Caramelized Nectarine and Apple-Cranberry Syrup

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The morning before last as I was pouring my second cup of coffee I heard a common request from my teenage son in the next room, “dad, will you make me breakfast” (translation: will you make me French toast…his favorite breakfast). Having not gone shopping in a while I knew the cupboards were somewhat bare but not entirely, so I said yes straight away. After slicing a few pieces of Ezekiel bread (click here and here for recipes) and soaking them in eggs and milk I looked for the maple syrup only to find none. Ditto on honey; and not even a few grains of sugar. We were, in fact, having a sweetness crises. Not to worry I thought, as I poured my third cup of coffee, pushed my two pugs out of way as they hovered under foot, and answered “In a couple minutes,” to my son’s inquiry as to how long before it were ready. I looked in the fridge and saw we had a partial half-gallon of cranberry-apple juice. Ahhh…sweetness, I said aloud. As any cook knows (lay or professional), when you reduce something (simmer it down), and as it gets less in volume, flavors intensify. If, for example, you left a soup on the edge of the stove to simmer too long it may become salty, and in the case of fruit juices–which are naturally sweet already–they become super sweet and viscous when cooked down…in short, a syrup. To add to the flavor I also included a slightly under-rip nectarine to the pan (being under-ripe it held up nicely to the cooking, but softened and sweetened as it cooked. As my son ate and I checked my email and drank coffee, he stopped momentarily and said, “Dad…this is really good.” That to me meant more than any kudos or accolades I may receive from the many paying customers I cook for almost every day. OK, they are not all kudos and accolades, but on this morning I felt awarded in a way I cannot describe. Anyhow, here it is in pictures.

>Ezekiel Bread French Toast with Caramelized Nectarine and Apple-Cranberry Syrup

1 Comment

>

The morning before last as I was pouring my second cup of coffee I heard a common request from my teenage son in the next room, “dad, will you make me breakfast” (translation: will you make me French toast…his favorite breakfast). Having not gone shopping in a while I knew the cupboards were somewhat bare but not entirely, so I said yes straight away. After slicing a few pieces of Ezekiel bread (click here and here for recipes) and soaking them in eggs and milk I looked for the maple syrup only to find none. Ditto on honey; and not even a few grains of sugar. We were, in fact, having a sweetness crises. Not to worry I thought, as I poured my third cup of coffee, pushed my two pugs out of way as they hovered under foot, and answered “In a couple minutes,” to my son’s inquiry as to how long before it were ready. I looked in the fridge and saw we had a partial half-gallon of cranberry-apple juice. Ahhh…sweetness, I said aloud. As any cook knows (lay or professional), when you reduce something (simmer it down), and as it gets less in volume, flavors intensify. If, for example, you left a soup on the edge of the stove to simmer too long it may become salty, and in the case of fruit juices–which are naturally sweet already–they become super sweet and viscous when cooked down…in short, a syrup. To add to the flavor I also included a slightly under-rip nectarine to the pan (being under-ripe it held up nicely to the cooking, but softened and sweetened as it cooked. As my son ate and I checked my email and drank coffee, he stopped momentarily and said, “Dad…this is really good.” That to me meant more than any kudos or accolades I may receive from the many paying customers I cook for almost every day. OK, they are not all kudos and accolades, but on this morning I felt awarded in a way I cannot describe. Anyhow, here it is in pictures.

Things That Can Be Carried On A Bike (#207)

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A canvas bag containing, among other things, three books, a daily planner, pencils, and reading glasses.
A six-foot long cable lock.
A small cardboard box containing three pints of homemade dog food and three sample packages of wild rice from Goose Valley Wild Rice.

>Things That Can Be Carried On A Bike (#207)

Leave a comment

>

A canvas bag containing, among other things, three books, a daily planner, pencils, and reading glasses.
A six-foot long cable lock.
A small cardboard box containing three pints of homemade dog food and three sample packages of wild rice from Goose Valley Wild Rice.

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