Tag Archives: fish recipes

Salt Cod and Potato Fritters!

I don’t have a lot to say about this recipe other than the fact that it is really easy to make and really super delicious. Okay, I lied, I do have a couple things to say about it. This is another recipe I’m testing from this book which I’m currently reviewing. This is the Middle Eastern version of a recipe that is universal nearly the world around. There are versions of salt cod-potato fritters in all of the Mediterranean countries, Central and South American, and much of the Caribbean. Yup, it’s that good. Being the Middle Eastern version, I ate this with cucumber-yogurt sauce and spicy red pepper puree, but any of your favorite dip would work. But to be honest, they are delicious as is or just with the squeeze of a lemon or lime.

 

Salt Cod-Potato Fritters

Makes about 3 dozen small fritters

1 pound salt cod
1 pound cold unseasoned mashed potatoes
1 small bunch flat leaf parsley, coarsely chopped
1 small bunch fresh dill, coarsely chopped
4 cloves garlic, minced
2 jalapeno peppers, finely diced
1 red bell pepper, fine diced
½ small onion, fine diced
1 teaspoon turmeric
½ teaspoon sea salt
½ teaspoon ground black pepper
1 teaspoon baking powder
½ cup all-purpose flower, plus extra for dusting
vegetable oil for pan-frying

Soak the cod in plenty of cold water for 4-6 hours—changing the water a couple times—to remove the saltiness. Dice the cod, and then shred it with your fingers, then place it into a bowl with the potatoes. Mix the potatoes and cod together, then add the remaining ingredients and mix together until thoroughly combined. Scoop small amounts of the mix onto a sheet-pan that has been lightly floured, and shape them into small patties. Heat about ¼-inch of vegetable oil in a large skillet over medium-high heat. Cook the patties for a few minutes on each side—in batches, if necessary—or until golden brown and cooked through. Transfer the fritters to absorbent paper and serve while hot.

Urban Simplicity.

Shellfish Chowder!

Super rich and creamy and chock full of shellfish, if you like seafood this is a recipe for you. This is just a basic recipe…change seafood and ingredients that you like. If you’d like additional chowder (and gumbo) recipes, along with its background, history, and lore, follow this link to an article I wrote some years ago.

Seafood Chowder

Makes 10-12 cups

2 lobster tails

1 pound shrimp

2 dozen mussels

2 dozen small clams

4 cups water

2 cups white wine

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6 tablespoons unsalted butter

1 onion, diced

3 stalks celery, diced

2 carrots, diced

½ cup flour

4 tablespoons tomato paste

2 tablespoons smoked paprika

1 teaspoon kosher salt

½ cup sherry

1 cup heavy cream

Combine the shellfish, water, and wine in a pot just large enough to contain it. Cover the pot and bring it to a boil. Lower to a simmer and cook the shellfish for about 15 minutes. Strain the shellfish from the broth, reserving both separately. When the seafood is cool enough to handle, remove it from their shells, discard the shells, and dice the seafood as needed.

Heat the butter in a heavy soup pot over medium-high heat. When it begins to bubble add the onion, celery, and carrot. Cook the vegetables for a couple minutes then add flour and cook another couple minutes while stirring. Next stir in the tomato paste, paprika, and kosher salt; stirring it to blend with the flour mixture. Add the reserved broth, and using a wire whisk, mix it until smooth. Bring to a boil, then lower to a low simmer. Cook the soup for about 5 minutes, then add the cooked seafood to the pot along with the sherry and cream. Simmer the chowder for another 5 minutes before serving.

Shellfish Chowder!

Super rich and creamy and chock full of shellfish, if you like seafood this is a recipe for you. This is just a basic recipe…change seafood and ingredients that you like. If you’d like additional chowder (and gumbo) recipes, along with its background, history, and lore, follow this link to an article I wrote some years ago.

Seafood Chowder
Makes 10-12 cups
2 lobster tails
1 pound shrimp
2 dozen mussels
2 dozen small clams
4 cups water
2 cups white wine
____________________
6 tablespoons unsalted butter
1 onion, diced
3 stalks celery, diced
2 carrots, diced
½ cup flour
4 tablespoons tomato paste
2 tablespoons smoked paprika
1 teaspoon kosher salt
½ cup sherry
1 cup heavy cream
Combine the shellfish, water, and wine in a pot just large enough to contain it. Cover the pot and bring it to a boil. Lower to a simmer and cook the shellfish for about 15 minutes. Strain the shellfish from the broth, reserving both separately. When the seafood is cool enough to handle, remove it from their shells, discard the shells, and dice the seafood as needed.
Heat the butter in a heavy soup pot over medium-high heat. When it begins to bubble add the onion, celery, and carrot. Cook the vegetables for a couple minutes then add flour and cook another couple minutes while stirring. Next stir in the tomato paste, paprika, and kosher salt; stirring it to blend with the flour mixture. Add the reserved broth, and using a wire whisk, mix it until smooth. Bring to a boil, then lower to a low simmer. Cook the soup for about 5 minutes, then add the cooked seafood to the pot along with the sherry and cream. Simmer the chowder for another 5 minutes before serving.

Rice with Fish and Other Good Things…

 

Okay. So this is good. Really good. Delicious, if I do say so. It’s also relatively easy to make. And of course this recipe–like most that I post here–is not carved in stone. It’s intended to be more of a guide. Interchange, add, or delete ingredients or seasonings that you like, don’t like, or happen to have on hand. It’s more of an idea of how to make a really delicious one-pot meal. Anyhow, if you like fish, try this. You wont be sorry. Did I mention it was delicious?

 

 

Tilapia and Brown Rice with Asparagus, Black Beans, Hot Pepper, Lemon, and Saffron

 

Serves 4

3 tablespoons olive oil

1 small onion, diced

1 small carrot, diced

2 ribs celery, diced

3 cloves garlic, minced

1 teaspoon crushed hot pepper

1 pinch saffron threads

1 cup brown rice

2 ½ cups simmering chicken broth

½ cup lemon juice

½ teaspoon sea salt

1 (15oz can) black beans, drained and rinsed

1 ½ pounds tilapia, diced

1 bunch asparagus, trimmed and cut into 1-inch pieces

Heat the olive oil in a heavy pot over medium-high heat, then add the onion, carrot, and celery. Cook the vegetables for a couple minutes while stirring, then add the garlic and cook another minute or so. Stir in the hot pepper and saffron, cook for a minute, then add the rice. Stir the rice to coat it with the oil and seasonings, then stir in the simmering broth, lemon juice, and sea salt. Bring to a boil, then lower to a simmer. Cover the pot with a tight-fitting lid, and simmer the rice untouched for about 30 minutes. After thirty minutes check the rice. It should be nearly done. If it is not add additional broth. Then layer the beans, tilapia, and asparagus on top of the rice without stirring and re-cover the pot. Cook the rice for another ten minutes and remove from the heat. Allow the pot to sit for five minutes. Gently fold the beans, asparagus, and fish into the rice just before serving.

Urban Simplicity.

Rice with Fish and Other Good Things…

Okay. So this is good. Really good. Delicious, if I do say so. It’s also relatively easy to make. And of course this recipe–like most that I post here–is not carved in stone. It’s intended to be more of a guide. Interchange, add, or delete ingredients or seasonings that you like, don’t like, or happen to have on hand. It’s more of an idea of how to make a really delicious one-pot meal. Anyhow, if you like fish, try this. You wont be sorry. Did I mention it was delicious?

Tilapia and Brown Rice with Asparagus, Black Beans, Hot Pepper, Lemon, and Saffron


Serves 4


3 tablespoons olive oil

1 small onion, diced

1 small carrot, diced

2 ribs celery, diced

3 cloves garlic, minced

1 teaspoon crushed hot pepper

1 pinch saffron threads

1 cup brown rice

2 ½ cups simmering chicken broth

½ cup lemon juice

½ teaspoon sea salt

1 (15oz can) black beans, drained and rinsed

1 ½ pounds tilapia, diced

1 bunch asparagus, trimmed and cut into 1-inch pieces


Heat the olive oil in a heavy pot over medium-high heat, then add the onion, carrot, and celery. Cook the vegetables for a couple minutes while stirring, then add the garlic and cook another minute or so. Stir in the hot pepper and saffron, cook for a minute, then add the rice. Stir the rice to coat it with the oil and seasonings, then stir in the simmering broth, lemon juice, and sea salt. Bring to a boil, then lower to a simmer. Cover the pot with a tight-fitting lid, and simmer the rice untouched for about 30 minutes. After thirty minutes check the rice. It should be nearly done. If it is not add additional broth. Then layer the beans, tilapia, and asparagus on top of the rice without stirring and re-cover the pot. Cook the rice for another ten minutes and remove from the heat. Allow the pot to sit for five minutes. Gently fold the beans, asparagus, and fish into the rice just before serving.

Urban Simplicity.

Fish Balls!

Ok. So I can hear you snickering. And also wondering…why fish? Well the simple answer is that I don’t eat a great deal of meat–almost never at home–and I really like fish. Anyhow, these are really delicious. I’ve posted other variations of these here (the tuna and chickpea meatballs are one of my favorites). Anyhow, I hope you try these. You’ll be glad you did…

Fish Meatballs with Sun-Dried Tomatoes
Makes about 2 dozen small meatballs
1 pound fish, diced
½ cup diced sun dried tomatoes
2 large eggs
2 slices whole wheat bread, crusts removed and diced
1/2 small onion, minced
2 cloves garlic, minced
½ teaspoon kosher salt
½ teaspoon crushed red pepper
Combine all of the ingredients in the bowl of a food processor and grind to a coarse paste. Transfer to a clean bowl and allow to rest for 5 minutes. Shape into meatballs (if it feels to wet or loose add more bread or a few tablespoons of whole wheat flour, then allow it to rest for five minutes again). Cook the meatballs in a skillet, in an oven, or poach them in sauce.