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Life and Death in the Cemetery

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Only when you accept that one day you’ll die can you let go, and make the best out of life. And that’s the big secret. That’s the miracle.”― Gabriel Bá

So first a couple things to preface this post. One is that I really like cemeteries. Okay, “like” may not be the correct word, but I do enjoy them. I find them peaceful and soothing. This said, Buffalo has an incredibly great cemetery, Forest Lawn. It was founded in 1849 and covers a vast 269 acres. It is smack in the middle of the city but because of its vastness it is an unintentional wildlife refuge of sorts (hence the title of this post). I stop here at least a couple times of year to pedal and coast silently through, to stop and contemplate, and to take photos of monuments, gravestones and wildlife. 


Anyhow, I hadn’t been there in a while and thought I’d stop by and take photos. I always love when I see deer there. They are so graceful and there is something about seeing them walking among the gravestones that makes them seem even more graceful, it really is a surreal sight. 

Last year I had heard about an albino fawn that was seen in the cemetery, and on two occasions had gone there specifically to see it, but to no avail. To be honest I thought it may have been an urban legend of sorts. Today I didn’t go there looking for deer, I simply wanted a slow cruise through this shady sanctuary on this incredibly hot summer day (90f/32c). 

As I was coasting down one of the rolling curvy roads I caught a glimpse of a deer off in the distance between some of the stones (the photos above and below are chronological). So I parked the bike and grabbed my camera and began to sort of tiptoe up to it. As I got closer I could see there were a few deer, maybe four (turns out there were a total of six). They saw me but didn’t move. I walked very slowly and snapped a few photos. Then, wandering out from behind a stone comes the albino fawn. I’m pretty sure I gasped.

After snapping a couple photos and walking closer two buck came trotting in. The one was so large I actually heard him before I saw him (see the third photo below). He was definitely the alpha of the herd. It really startled me because I was pretty close, there was no one else around, and the animal was large. He saw me immediately and began to walk towards me then stopped, putting himself between me and his family. I did not want to even raise the camera because I didn’t know what Papa Buck was thinking. As graceful as they are they are prone to charge, especially if they feel their young are threatened. Anyhow, to make a long story short, I sort of backed away and Papa Buck led his family in another direction.

To see some previous postings of Forest Lawn Cemetery, with photos, click here.

 

Sister Summer…

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Sister Summer

You enter so quietly

With subtle beauty

You arrive almost unnoticed

Until you are here

And when you approach

You bring with you

Such vibrancy

Not just in color

But all the senses

Flowers bloom in your presence

Offering themselves to you

Even the weeds bloom

Returning on queue

With you

Your hot days

Yield to gentle evening breeze

Awaking cricketers

And other nocturnal things

Which also yield to you

You turn things

Upside down, right side up

Long days

But then you leave

As quietly as you came

Stay with us

Sister Summer

Your comfort

Is welcoming

Becoming

evening

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the day fades
night slithers in
another day in life
tomorrow is new
another chance
to be alive
to live
moment by moment
but for now
it is evening

The Day of the Resurrection (Journal Entry: 1 April 2018)

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The Day’s First Light

“Midway upon the journey of our life, I found myself within a forest dark, for the straightforward pathway had been lost.”  ~ Dante Alighieri, The Divine Comedy

This morning while doing some reading I stumbled upon the above quote and it could not have been more appropriate, and this, I suppose, can be interpreted in a number of ways. While I woke in a dark place today I also find inspiration in the darkness, but I’m jumping ahead.

Today is Easter morning, the celebration of the resurrection, a celebration of all that is light and hope. But I woke to internal darkness. It wasn’t sudden, it’s been stalking me for a while. I could feel it, sense it, see it lurking behind corners just behind me. Then like a thief in the night it engulfed me. This is not to say that I am in despair, as I have been before, just like so many others. I can still see the light, and know that the light is achievable, it’s just that it is in the distance, slightly out of reach.

The darkness, which can take many forms, has been a mild feeling of uncertainty for a while…weeks or months, I can’t recall. But now it is time to grab hold of certainty. As a natural observer and creatively inclined, it’s easy for me to see things then capture them in a photo, or words, or a drawing, but at the same time it is difficulty to observe myself. Not just my physical actions but internally as well, and that’s where things begin, on the inside.

There are some changes that need to take place in my life, which I am aware of, and that can only happen from the inside out through introspection first, then action. Easter is the day of resurrection, a day of hope and rebirth, thus it is also a good day to begin again, and likely tomorrow begin again, and then again. The light is within reach, and the darkness cannot overcome it. Now it’s up to me to reach for it.

“Do not conform to the pattern of this world, but be transformed by the renewing of your mind.” ~ Romans 12:2

The Second March Moon…what’s in a name?

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Everyone is a moon, and has a dark side which he never shows to anybody.
~ Mark Twain

The above photo is one I shot last night from the sidewalk in front of my small and disheveled Allentown (Buffalo, NY) home. The moon was 99.7% full last night and tonight it will be 100%. I took the photo last night while I had the chance as it is supposed to be overcast this evening. 

Anyhow, this is the second full moon this month, which makes it a blue moon. Some Native American tribes refer to this as the worm moon because it is the time of year that the ground softens enough for earth worms reappear, which then brings birds. The early American Colonists referred to this moon as the sap moon because it was at this time of the year that maple sap really began to run. It is also sometimes called the Lenten moon, because it signifies the end of the Christian period of Lent.

This brings me to the next brief topic, and some of you may already know this, but this moon is also the reason that the date of Easter changes each year. Easter is always on the first Sunday after the first full moon after the spring equinox, which of course shows the early Pagan roots of Easter and Christianity (please don’t send me hate mail or try to “save me,” this is fact-based information).  Anyhow, this is pretty interesting stuff, I think. But I’ll get off my little soap box now.

Urban Simplicity.

The Element of Texture…

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“The photographer has almost as much control over his subject matter as a painter. He can control light and shade, form and space, pattern and texture, motion and mood, everything except composition.” ~Andreas Feininger

Due to foul weather (yep it snows every once in a while in Buffalo) the opening has been changed to Friday March 23.

Here’s a last minute plug for a group show I’m part of, which opens this evening. I’m one of, I believe, eight artists. I’ve seen some of the work of the other artists and it is going to be a really interesting group of art. The show, which is part of the First Friday Gallery Walk, is at Parables Gallery on Elmwood Avenue (click here for a map to the location). The show focuses on the elements of texture; the two photos pictured are two of seven or eight of mine that will be hanging in the gallery. The above photo is of Little Italy, NYC, and the below photo is of my neighborhood just after a heavy snow a couple weeks ago (click either photo for a slightly larger view). The show is up for the entire month of March, but the opening is tonight from 7pm-9pm. Here’s a link with additional info provided by the gallery owner. I hope to see you there.

 

Urban Simplicity.

Lake Effect!

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Snowflakes are one of nature’s most fragile things, but just look what they can do when they stick together.”
― Vesta M. Kelly

 So the other day it snowed. Hard. Lake effect snow. I had the day off so I went for a walk and took a few pictures. If you have never been to the east of any of the Great Lakes during the winter, or you are not familiar with the term “lake effect,” this page can explain it. Anyhow, click any picture for a slightly larger image.

Urban Simplicity.

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