Category Archives: thankfulness

Sometimes it’s the Little Things…

Here’s a brief story to explain this picture. At least six months ago a co-worker gave me two reflective dog collars knowing I had two dogs. Though it was a nice gesture I am still uncertain as to why she gave them to me. They were too small for the dogs so I put them in the back room of my house and they became absorbed in the vortex of other various items that seem to disappear there. Anyhow, over the weekend I was back there rearranging things and came across one. And not only did I notice that it had Velcro clips on it but when I picked it up it lit up (and I thought it was simply reflective). The Velcro is great for attaching to the rear rack of a bike. So, yup…you guessed it…two of my bikes are now sporting dog collars. So when I go into work tomorrow I have to remember to offer a belated thank you to this gift-giver. Sometimes it’s the little things that really make my day.

Urban Simplicity.

A Garden of Eden in Hell

The above image is that of Alice Herz-Sommer, who is also the interviewee in the below short but very inspiring video. At 108 years young she is the oldest known living Holocaust survivor. A few years ago–at the age of 104–she wrote a book called A Garden of Eden in Hell, retelling her amazing life story. Her secret to survival and longevity, it seems, is gratitude, thankfulness, and positive thinking. Many of us, I believe, can learn a lot from this woman and this short clip…I know I can. It’s well worth the twelve minutes to watch this. To read a very short bio of her, click here.

Urban Simplicity.

Five Quotes on Being Thankful

I find the above painting very moving. It is “The Thankful Poor” by Henry Ossawa Tanner. On this day, the American holiday of Thanksgiving, I think it is especially poignant…though most of us (especially myself) have more than they need–food, clothing, shelter, family, etc.–we still desire more, and sometimes we (again, I’m mostly speaking of myself here) forget to stop and be thankful for all that we have in our lives…and that we not only have everything we need we actually have more than we need. I personally should be more aware of all the grace and gifts that I have in my life, and the above painting is a good reminder for me.

The next couple paragraphs is an excerpt from an article regarding Tanner and his work. I came across it at the Washington Post  (written by Jabari Asim), click here to read the full story.


Tanner did his best work in Paris after arriving there in 1891. The son of escaped slaves, he had studied for six years with Thomas Eakins, the dean of the American Naturalist school, at the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts. Tanner was grateful for Eakins’ tutelage as well as for the generous financial support of Bishop and Mrs. Joseph Hartzell of Philadelphia, who paid for his journey overseas. But his benefactors were enlightened exceptions to the American racism of that period. In search of a less encumbered lifestyle, Tanner settled in the City of Light and eventually won widespread acclaim.

In 1894 Tanner painted “The Thankful Poor,” an oil-on-canvas portrait of an elderly black man sitting down to supper with a young boy. Their heads are bowed in prayer. The man’s rough hands and the boy’s bedraggled clothes suggest that they are no strangers to privation and toil. The table is plain and sparse, but Tanner has endowed the humble pair with an aura of hard-earned dignity — even a rough-edged beauty.

“The Thankful Poor” is slowly becoming a familiar image. After lingering in a school closet for 75 years, it was rediscovered and auctioned at Sotheby’s in 1981. Bill and Camille Cosby purchased it for $250,000, at the time the most ever spent for a painting by an African-American artist.

“Thanksgiving was never meant to be shut up in a single day.”
— Robert C. Linter

“If thank you is the only prayer you say, that will be enough.”
— Meister Eckhart

 “Thanksgiving, after all, is a word of action.”
— W.J. Cameron

“Let us remember that, as much has been given us, much will be expected from us, and that true homage comes from the heart as well as from the lips, and shows itself in deeds.”
–Theodore Roosevelt

 “A thankful heart is not only the greatest virtue, but the parent of all the other virtues.”
— Cicero

Five Quotes on Being Thankful

I find the above painting very moving. It is “The Thankful Poor” by Henry Ossawa Tanner. On this day, the American holiday of Thanksgiving, I think it is especially poignant…though most of us (especially myself) have more than they need–food, clothing, shelter, family, etc.–we still desire more, and sometimes we (again, I’m mostly speaking of myself here) forget to stop and be thankful for all that we have in our lives…and that we not only have everything we need we actually have more than we need. I personally should be more aware of all the grace and gifts that I have in my life, and the above painting is a good reminder for me.

The next couple paragraphs is an excerpt from an article regarding Tanner and his work. I came across it at the Washington Post  (written by Jabari Asim), click here to read the full story.


Tanner did his best work in Paris after arriving there in 1891. The son of escaped slaves, he had studied for six years with Thomas Eakins, the dean of the American Naturalist school, at the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts. Tanner was grateful for Eakins’ tutelage as well as for the generous financial support of Bishop and Mrs. Joseph Hartzell of Philadelphia, who paid for his journey overseas. But his benefactors were enlightened exceptions to the American racism of that period. In search of a less encumbered lifestyle, Tanner settled in the City of Light and eventually won widespread acclaim.

In 1894 Tanner painted “The Thankful Poor,” an oil-on-canvas portrait of an elderly black man sitting down to supper with a young boy. Their heads are bowed in prayer. The man’s rough hands and the boy’s bedraggled clothes suggest that they are no strangers to privation and toil. The table is plain and sparse, but Tanner has endowed the humble pair with an aura of hard-earned dignity — even a rough-edged beauty.

“The Thankful Poor” is slowly becoming a familiar image. After lingering in a school closet for 75 years, it was rediscovered and auctioned at Sotheby’s in 1981. Bill and Camille Cosby purchased it for $250,000, at the time the most ever spent for a painting by an African-American artist.

“Thanksgiving was never meant to be shut up in a single day.”
— Robert C. Linter

“If thank you is the only prayer you say, that will be enough.”
— Meister Eckhart

 “Thanksgiving, after all, is a word of action.”
— W.J. Cameron

“Let us remember that, as much has been given us, much will be expected from us, and that true homage comes from the heart as well as from the lips, and shows itself in deeds.”
–Theodore Roosevelt

 “A thankful heart is not only the greatest virtue, but the parent of all the other virtues.”
— Cicero

A Few Recipes for Thanksgiving

I was going to post a few recipes for the Thanksgiving holiday but after I thought about it it would be just as easy (and likely more informative) simply to link previous articles that I’ve written and are still floating around the Internet (not to mention a bit of shameless self-promotion…I’m getting better at this).

Anyhow, if you want to read all about gravy click the following link.

Gravy Deconstructed

To read how to roast things–including turkey–follow this link (this was the very first article I wrote for Buffalo Spree Magazine about 15 years ago…I could not find it  at their site but did find it at ChefTalk).

How to Roast a Chicken and Other Savory Foods

If you’d like a few ideas of what to do with Thanksgiving leftovers (which I enjoy as much as the original meal), follow these two links.

The Big Bird

On Giving Thanks

A Few Recipes for Thanksgiving

I was going to post a few recipes for the Thanksgiving holiday but after I thought about it it would be just as easy (and likely more informative) simply to link previous articles that I’ve written and are still floating around the Internet (not to mention a bit of shameless self-promotion…I’m getting better at this).

Anyhow, if you want to read all about gravy click the following link.

Gravy Deconstructed

To read how to roast things–including turkey–follow this link (this was the very first article I wrote for Buffalo Spree Magazine about 15 years ago…I could not find it  at their site but did find it at ChefTalk).

How to Roast a Chicken and Other Savory Foods

If you’d like a few ideas of what to do with Thanksgiving leftovers (which I enjoy as much as the original meal), follow these two links.

The Big Bird

On Giving Thanks

>10 Quotes On Being Thankful (Happy Thanksgiving!)

>

Most of the readers are probably aware this, but in the event you are reading this blog outside North America, today is our American Thanksgiving, which is similar but on a different date than the Canadian holiday by the same name (click here to read about the Thanksgiving Holiday). This has always been my favorite holiday because it is about family, friends, and most importantly, food. And as I’ve gotten older I’ve come to view this day as a day to–without trying too sound hokey–count my blessings; a day to be thankful.
Happy Thanksgiving!

“As we express our gratitude, we must never forget that the highest appreciation is not to utter words, but to live by them.”
John F. Kennedy

“Gratitude is the memory of the heart.”
Jean Baptiste Massieu

“I would maintain that thanks are the highest form of thought, and that gratitude is happiness doubled by wonder.”
G.K. Chesterton

“God gave you a gift of 86,400 seconds today. Have you used one to say “thank you?””
William Arthur Ward

“Thankfulness is the beginning of gratitude.Gratitude is the completion of thankfulness. Thankfulness may consist merely of words. Gratitude is shown in acts.”
David O. McKay

“We can only be said to be alive in those moments when our hearts are conscious of our treasures.”
Thornton Wilder

“You simply will not be the same person two months from now after consciously giving thanks each day for the abundance that exists in your life. And you will have set in motion an ancient spiritual law: the more you have and are grateful for, the more will be given you.”
Sarah Ban Breathnach
 

“I awoke this morning with devout thanksgiving for my friends, the old and the new.”
Ralph Waldo Emerson

“A thankful heart is not only the greatest virtue, but the parent of all other virtues.”
Cicero
 
“The roots of all goodness lie in the soil of appreciation for goodness.” The Dalai Lama

10 Quotes On Being Thankful (Happy Thanksgiving!)

Most of the readers are probably aware this, but in the event you are reading this blog outside North America, today is our American Thanksgiving, which is similar but on a different date than the Canadian holiday by the same name (click here to read about the Thanksgiving Holiday). This has always been my favorite holiday because it is about family, friends, and most importantly, food. And as I’ve gotten older I’ve come to view this day as a day to–without trying too sound hokey–count my blessings; a day to be thankful.
Happy Thanksgiving!

“As we express our gratitude, we must never forget that the highest appreciation is not to utter words, but to live by them.”
John F. Kennedy

“Gratitude is the memory of the heart.”
Jean Baptiste Massieu

“I would maintain that thanks are the highest form of thought, and that gratitude is happiness doubled by wonder.”
G.K. Chesterton

“God gave you a gift of 86,400 seconds today. Have you used one to say “thank you?””
William Arthur Ward

“Thankfulness is the beginning of gratitude.Gratitude is the completion of thankfulness. Thankfulness may consist merely of words. Gratitude is shown in acts.”
David O. McKay

“We can only be said to be alive in those moments when our hearts are conscious of our treasures.”
Thornton Wilder

“You simply will not be the same person two months from now after consciously giving thanks each day for the abundance that exists in your life. And you will have set in motion an ancient spiritual law: the more you have and are grateful for, the more will be given you.”
Sarah Ban Breathnach
 

“I awoke this morning with devout thanksgiving for my friends, the old and the new.”
Ralph Waldo Emerson

“A thankful heart is not only the greatest virtue, but the parent of all other virtues.”
Cicero
 
“The roots of all goodness lie in the soil of appreciation for goodness.” The Dalai Lama

Miracle In A Chilean Desert

 Image found here.

By now everyone around the world has heard of the safe rescue of the 33 miners and two paramedics in the Chilean mine, but I still felt the need to offer a brief post. I applaud these men for their spirit and endurance; it is beyond my comprehension. It’s said that a person really does not know what they are capable of until put to a test. Well I can honestly say that I do not know if I could have survived such an ordeal…especially those first 17 days without contact. And the two men that went down to assist prior to the rescue are equally heroic…so too for all those who aided and prayed throughout the weeks and months. I heard one of the master drillers interviewed on the radio the other day and he commented (I’m paraphrasing) how everything he has done in his life has lead up to this, that this is the most important thing. Then he added that he’s usually drilling for copper, but today he is drilling for human life. It brings tears to my eyes still.

Their rescue, I truly believe, is nothing short of a miracle.

Thank you Lord….Gracias Señor!

>Miracle In A Chilean Desert

>

 Image found here.

By now everyone around the world has heard of the safe rescue of the 33 miners and two paramedics in the Chilean mine, but I still felt the need to offer a brief post. I applaud these men for their spirit and endurance; it is beyond my comprehension. It’s said that a person really does not know what they are capable of until put to a test. Well I can honestly say that I do not know if I could have survived such an ordeal…especially those first 17 days without contact. And the two men that went down to assist prior to the rescue are equally heroic…so too for all those who aided and prayed throughout the weeks and months. I heard one of the master drillers interviewed on the radio the other day and he commented (I’m paraphrasing) how everything he has done in his life has lead up to this, that this is the most important thing. Then he added that he’s usually drilling for copper, but today he is drilling for human life. It brings tears to my eyes still.

Their rescue, I truly believe, is nothing short of a miracle.

Thank you Lord….Gracias Señor!